Water Heater Maintenance – Continued

There are some more tasks that need to be completed on an annual basis.  Most of them can be done when you pull the unit out of storage and before you start it for the season.  If you are full time then perform them when you do the cleaning of the storage tank for calcium.

BUGS, there are several kinds of bugs that love the smell of propane.  If your water heater does not have a bug protector on the exhaust, spend the money an put one on it.  They look like a heavy duty screen over the exhaust vent.  Each year you want to make sure this is secure and in good condition.

Electric Heating element check.  It is probably a good idea to check the condition of the electric heating element.  You probably cleaned the tank which should clean the element as well.  Over time these heating elements break down and require replacement.  The easiest way to check an element is with a VOM (Voltage Ohm Meter or Multi-meter).  With power removed from the water heater, measure the Ohms of the heating element.  It should be slightly more than 10 Ohms.  If it is less than 10 ohms, you will want to replace it.

Safety Valve Check.  On the outside of the water heater is a pressure and maybe temperature safety valve.  This is used to prevent the pressure in the water heater from exceeding 150 PSI.  When water heats it expand and can cause the tank to rupture.

Over time the valves will corrode or become clogged with deposits.  That annual cleaning I talked about should help prevent this, but just in case.  Each year you want to open this valve.

Note:
A. Be careful, the water inside the tank may be hot.
B. Only do this when you are going to drain the tank for cleaning or for storage.

To relieve the pressure in the tank before removing the plug or anode rod, operate the safety valve by lifting up on the little lever on the valve.  WARNING: the water may be hot and some of it will come out of the valve.  Wear appropriate protection.

Air in tank check.  Some of you may have heard about burbing the water tank.  This practice is not required and in some cases may damage the water heater.  When you fill the water heater for the first camping trip of the season.  First make sure that everything is back in it place.  The plug or anode rod are installed, the water is turned on and fills the tank.  Then go inside and make sure the by-pass has been closed so that water now flows through the water heater.  Open a hot water faucet furthest away from the heater and and let it run until the air is out of the system.  This will provide the proper amount of air in the water heater to allow for expansion of the water when it heats up.  You can perform the same steps at each faucet to get the air out of the lines.

Next article will be about the Aqua Hot and On Demand System Maintenance.

 

Source: Tips of the Day

Water Heater Maintenance

There are currently 4 different water heater types you might find in an RV.  The two most common are from Suburban and Atwood.  New to the RV world are the On Demand Water Heaters and in higher end motor homes you might find a system that provides both heat and hot water called Aqua Hot.

Maintenance on Atwood heaters is pretty simple.  About once a year usually when you winterize, you want to clean out the water heater holding tank really well.  The best way is to take out the drain plug.  Caution here:  Make sure the tank is cool and that the power and propane are off to the water heater.  You do not want the heater to begin trying to heat the water when the tank is empty.

Once you have removed the drain plug, flush the tank with plenty of water to remove the loose calcium.  Next you will need some white vinegar.  About a gallon for the 10 gallon water heater.  This is a good time to also clean the water holding tank on the RV.   Perform the same basic steps, drain the water in the holding tank, flush to remove the calcium and then using a ration of 1:10 (vinegar to water) fill the holding tank.  If you are doing the holding tank at the same time it will make it easier to do the how water system.  Fill the holding tank with vinegar and then pump it into the hot water tank (make sure you put the plug in the water heater before filling).

Once the vinegar and water are in the tank(s) let it sit for a couple of days.  The acid in the vinegar will loosen the calcium.

After a couple of days, drain and flush the system(s).  If you are working on a Suburban Hot Water system, now is a good time to replace the Anode Rod.

Then Anode rod is to protect the insides of the steel tanks used in Suburban water heaters from rusting due to chemical reactions in the water.  The Anode rod is made of a mixture of Zinc, Magnesium and Aluminum.  Which reacts quicker to the chemicals in water that can rust the steel tank.  Failure to replace the anode rod as needed results in the water tank rusting out and having to replace it sooner than needed otherwise.

That is it for the normal water heaters found in most RVs.  I am still researching the maintenance of on demand and Aqua Hot systems.  Those will be covered in the next article.

 

 

Source: Tips of the Day

Escapees!

Well we joined Escapees this last month.  We are staying at Rainbow Plantation in Summerdale, AL.  We will be here for a couple of weeks.  Our grand daughter Melissa will be spending the weekend with us.  She lives in Mobile, AL and a good friend of ours from the military (Linda Poole) lives full time at the park.

For those of you that are not Escapees members they have parks around the country, mainly in the South.  I don’t know a lot about the programs yet, but the people are very friendly.  Free Hugs when you register at the campground.  We will be staying at another Escapees park in TN (Racoon Valley) later in April.  The camping rates aren’t too bad.  We are paying about $20 a night with full hook up.

Today is Flea Market day and we are waiting for Linda to show up so we can go spend some of the kids inheritance.   With a little luck they won’t have to worry about paying any inheritance tax when we pass away 🙂

 

Last trip to Epcot for the season

Jo Ann & Jim Rohn, Daisy and I went to Epcot last night to watch the fireworks. It will be our last trip to Disney for this season.  Tomorrow we pack up and head towards Mobile, AL.  I can not believe how short Winter has been.  We have been in FL since January and have had a blast.

Here are some pictures from Epcot.  They have their Flower Show going on now.

Part of the swimming area in Disney
Part of the swimming area in Disney
Snow White
Snow White
Flower Show
Flower Show
Beauty and the Beast
Beauty and the Beast
Bonsai Tree
Bonsai Tree
Lady and the Tramp
Lady and the Tramp
Miss Piggy
Miss Piggy
Epcot
Epcot
Fireworks
Fireworks
More Fireworks
More Fireworks
Pooh
Pooh
Daisy is waiting for our Chauffeur.
Daisy is waiting for our Chauffeur.

Can’t believe another 2 weeks is coming to an end.

First, I know I was suppose to have the second part of the delamination process done today, but the manufacture hasn’t gotten the information to me yet.  Hopefully it will be ready for next weekend.

We are Sherwood Forest until Wednesday then we will be heading to Mobile, AL for 2 weeks.  I can’t believe that the Winter is coming to an end and it is time to leave FL.  It has been a great Winter!  We saw Manatees, a couple rocket launches, met some new friends, got back together with some old friends.  Learned some new board games, made repairs on the rig, got the car fixed, broke the car, waiting for the car to be fixed again.  Watched some great sunsets, woke up to some peaceful mornings watching the river go by.

I think I am over the Peaceriveritis.  It is  a illness that I hope to catch again next year.   Not sure if Sherwood Forest has any specific illnesses, but it has been a great place to stay.

I think you will start to see some videos showing up here soon.  I am thinking of taking some of the pictures we have taken of our time here and using Camtasia to create something unique.  I really like the Camtasia software.

 

Delamination – What is it?

If you read Facebook RV Groups at all or any RV Forums you will see many articles or questions about delamination.  Many of us know little about the issue but maybe would like to know more or you need to know how to fix it.

I recently chatted with Andrew Newton of Composet Products L.L.C.  Composet offers a product for fixing delamination.  I asked Andrew about delamination and what causes it.  Here are some of the questions and his responses.

What is delamination?

Many RV walls are a “composite”, meaning different materials are bonded together in layers. Typically, a thin fiberglass sheet forms the outer layer, followed by luan plywood*, Styrofoam, and an inside panel. Framing elements are also incorporated into the wall. The materials are glued together creating a composite structure. Delamination occurs when the bond between one or more layers fails. This happens in isolated segments, or throughout the entire panel.

Why does delamination occur?

In many cases a leak forms allowing water into the wall. Typically this happens at windows, vents, lights, roof lines, etc., where caulking is sometimes the only barrier to outside elements. Age, workmanship, vibration, maintenance, and environmental exposure are factors. In my opinion, most delamination occurs when the water breaks down the glue used in the manufacture of the luan plywood and results in the plies separating.

How can you spot delamination?

Look at the wall from an angle and check for bulges. Most sidewalls are not perfectly flat, so this can be tricky, however, the bulge will be worse when the wall is in direct sunlight due to the de-bonded materials expanding at different rates. Next, tap lightly on the wall with a plastic screwdriver handle, solid areas and delaminated areas sound different.

How is delamination fixed?

The most comprehensive way to fix delamination is by replacing the entire wall, requiring major reconstruction. Sometimes sections of walls are cut out, with a seam or joint created where the patch panel is installed. I have seen cases where the layers are re-bonded one at a time. Another process, developed by our company, Composet Products L.L.C., utilizes an injection process to saturate the affected area with a proprietary catalyzed composite bonding adhesive, followed by clamping. Every situation is different with your expectations and budget guiding the definition of a successful repair.

*Luan or Lauan plywood is made from the wood of the Lauan tree from the South Pacific Rim. Lauan wood is usually referred to a medium-grade Philippine mahogany. This produces a very lightweight wood that is softer than most softwood plywood. The surface finish of Luan plywood is very smooth, mostly without defects. The small defects that are found are filled and sanded smooth with the surface. However, because of these defects, Luan is generally only used for projects that will be painted.

Thickness

Luan is typically only manufactured in 1/4 inch thickness, although you can find it as thin as 1/8 inch at times.

Next week, I will go over the process of repairing delamination using the products that Andrew’s company offers.  It is an inexpensive kit that fixes a very expensive repair.

If you need more information or want to learn more about how to fix delamination, contact:

Composet Products L.L.C.
801-821-0964

http://www.delamrepair.com

 

Source: Tips of the Day

Creating videos

I have been learning Camtasia.  Camtasia is a video creation package that allows you to bring life to Power Point Presentations, Photos and Videos.  You can do a lot of amazing things with it.

I am a Dri Wash n’ Guard Manager.  I have written a manual on how to start and run a RV Detailing business.  Here are two videos I have created this week with Camtasia.

Detailing Chrome

Detailing Tires

 

Moving day tomorrow

Tomorrow is moving day. Heading back to Sherwood Forest from Crystal River. Been a nice two weeks here. But we are really tired of the no see em’s. Daisy is so bitten up, they even attacked me! Got to see some manatees, made a video for my daughters 4th grade class about Manatees. Found some really good Mexican food and even a few Walmarts. Even went down to Tampa area for a day to the Sponge Docks.
Kind of looking forward to getting back together with Jo Ann Rohn and Jim and two of our other friends in the Orlando area. Going to make some Lasagna one weekend.

Hopefully we can get our Energy Management System fixed while there.  We were suppose to get it fixed a few weeks ago, but found out that the extended warranty had a problem.  It seemed that when we were issued new credit cards that dropped the automatic payments.  Instead of getting a hold of us, they canceled the policy.  Actually worked out better as we felt it wasn’t really going to be worth it at this stage.  I know the condition of the RV and don’t feel we would have gotten our money’s worth from it over the next couple year.  So cancelling it got us money back and more than enough to fix the EMS.  The problem is one circuit board which cost about $200.

Did the trip planning up until May this year.  All the reservation are made.  We will be heading to Mobile AL for 2 weeks, then northern AL for 3 weeks at Hidden Cove.  From there to Carolina Landing for 3 more weeks.  I like this kind of trips.  3 weeks means no rushing around.  From Carolina Landing we head over to Fuquay Varina, NC to see our great grand daughter, Piper.  Some time in mid June we finally get back to PA to see the family.

DSC_0062 DSC_0068 DSC_0058 DSC_0057 DSC_0054 DSC_0048 DSC_0042 DSC_0027

Crystal Isle Site
Crystal Isle Site

Just wanted to let you know about the Facebook Page

I also have a Facebook Page that is used to support this site.  You can access it at Facebook Page.

I am starting to work on the video series.  It will cover the complete inspection process from roof to frame and everything in between.  Not sure how long this is going to take, probably a few months at least.  Also haven’t figured out what or if I will be charging for this.  I do plan on having a manual that will go with the videos.

Please let me know if you have any ideas or special interests.

 

Source: Tips of the Day